1) Historical Dictionary of Croatia – Robert

1) Historical Dictionary of Croatia – Robert Stallaerts
Scarecrow Press | 2009 | PDF

Croatia, a former republic of Yugoslavia, has been a self-declared independent state since July 25, 1991. To its own people, however, it is a much older country that is finally getting another chance to forge a nation. The Croats trace their roots back many centuries, and the depth of this resurgent nationalism helps explain why Yugoslavia split as it did and where it did. As Croatia and its people try to make a success of their new state, they can take hope in the notable progress that has already been made in regards to its economic restructuring, democratization, and a rapprochement with their neighbors and Europe more broadly.

The third edition of the Historical Dictionary of Croatia relates the history of this country through a detailed chronology, an introduction, a bibliography, and cross-referenced dictionary entries on significant persons, places, and events; institutions and organizations; and political, economic, social, cultural, and religious facets.

2) Historical Dictionary of Bosnia and Herzegovina – Ante Cuvalo
Scarecrow Press | 2007 | PDF

Diversity has always been at the heart of Bosnia and Herzegovina’s character; even its dual name and physical geography display a particular heterogeneity. The medieval Bosnian state never enjoyed lasting political and ideological unity as its feudal, regional, and religious rifts pulled at the country’s seams. Furthermore, because of its location and by a quirk of history, three major world religious and cultural traditions (Catholicism, Islam, and Orthodoxy) became cohabitants in this small Balkan country. Recently, the rebirth of its statehood has been exceptionally bloody and its diversity has been shaken. Even eleven years after the guns were silenced, the country is still under the “benevolent” protection of the international community, whose officials are keeping the state-building process in perpetual suspense, with no final result in sight.

The second edition of the Historical Dictionary of Bosnia and Herzegovina sheds light on the uncertain situation Bosnia and Herzegovina faces, while providing essential background information. This is accomplished through a chronology, an introduction, a bibliography, and more than 300 cross-referenced dictionary entries on individual topics spanning Bosnia and Herzegovina’s political, economic, religious, and social system along with short biographies on important figures.

3) Historical Dictionary of Albania – Robert Elsie
Scarecrow Press | 2010 | PDF

Albania is not well known by outsiders; it was deliberately closed to the outside world during the communist era. Now it has thankfully become free again, its borders are open and it can be visited, and it is increasingly integrating with the rest of Europe and beyond. Unfortunately, Albania has had its share of problems in the post-communist era; it’s a land of destitution and despair, thanks in part to the Albanian mafia, which has turned the country into one of blood-feuds, kalashnikovs, and eternal crises. Yet, Albania is, in essence, a European nation like any other and will soon, it is to be hoped, advance and take its proper place in Europe and the world.

The second edition of the Historical Dictionary of Albania relates the history of this little-known country through a detailed chronology, an introduction, a bibliography, appendixes, and over 700 cross-referenced dictionary entries on significant persons, places, and events; institutions and organizations; and political, economic, social, cultural, and religious facets.

4) Historical Dictionary of the Republic of Macedonia –
Scarecrow Press | 2009 | PDF

Located at the very heart of the Balkans, the Republic of Macedonia has a rich and turbulent history, which reflects all the complexities of the region’s past and present-day politics. In the late 19th and the early 20th century, it became the focal point of competition by the fledgling Balkan nation-states over the declining Ottoman Empire’s European possessions. Late Ottoman Macedonia was a region, which impressed the external observer with its diversity: ethnic, religious, linguistic, clannish, and territorial identities all overlapped in a complex and puzzling mosaic. It is this diversity that has led to the Macedonian Question of the late 19th and early 20th centuries and continues to raise questions today.

The Historical Dictionary of the Republic of Macedonia traces the key political, socio-economic, and cultural developments in the multiethnic mosaic that is Republic of Macedonia following its secession from the Yugoslav federation in the autumn of 1991. It also surveys often overlooked topics, such as the social transformations underwent in the course of the 20th century and during the decades of socialism, as well as the recent debates about historical memory and roots of the Slav Macedonian nation. Complete with a chronology, an introductory essay, a bibliography, and over 400 hundred cross-referenced dictionary entries, this reference provides a rich account of the history, present-day politics, and society of the Republic of Macedonia.

5) Historical Dictionary of Bulgaria – Raymond Detrez
Scarecrow Press | 2006 | PDF

Few states have fought as hard or as long to be established as that of the Republic of Bulgaria. The Bulgarians have over the centuries created their own principalities, kingdoms, and republics only to have them crushed by stronger entities, including the Byzantine and Ottoman Empires. While recently, the communist regime was largely dominated by and overly submissive to the Soviet Union. Fortunately, about fifteen years ago, a new republic arose, which began revamping the economy, reviving the political life, and forging a new place in Europe.

This second edition of the Historical Dictionary of Bulgaria contains more than 600 cross-referenced entries on Bulgarian historical periods, places, terms, organizations, events, and personalities. The number of entries, dealing with historical figures and events, has been considerably enlarged, and all of the entries of the first edition that have remained were carefully updated. The newest insights of Bulgarian historiography as practiced in Bulgaria and abroad are also reflected. In addition, the book includes a brief introduction into Bulgarian history from the earliest times until mid-2005 (including the formation of the current cabinet), an easy-reference chronology of Bulgarian history, several maps, and lists of Bulgarian political parties, administrations, and leaders. A comprehensive bibliography is included to facilitate further reading on Bulgaria and Bulgarian history.